Frequently Asked Questions

What do the controls cover? 

Controls cover the export, transit and brokering of items listed in the Schedule to the Military Equipment (Export Control) Regulations, SL365.13​ and the more updated EU Common Military List​.

What are the categories of the Military List?

Military equipment is categorized under 22 distinct categories as defined below:

ML1   Smooth-bore weapons with a calibre of less than 20 mm, other arms and automatic weapons with a calibre of 12,7 mm (calibre 0,50 inches) or less and accessories, and specially designed components therefor

ML2    Smooth-bore weapons with a calibre of 20 mm or more, other weapons or armament with a calibre greater than 12,7 mm (calibre 0,50 inches), projectors and accessories, and specially designed components therefor

ML3    Ammunition and fuze setting devices, and specially designed components therefor

ML4  Bombs, torpedoes, rockets, missiles, other explosive devices and charges and related equipment and accessories, and specially designed components therefor

ML5  Fire control, and related alerting and warning equipment, and related systems, test and alignment and countermeasure equipment, specially designed for military use, and specially designed components and accessories therefor

ML6    Ground vehicles and components

ML7  Chemical agents, "biological agents", "riot control agents", radioactive materials, related equipment, components and materials

ML8    "Energetic materials", and related substances

ML9   Vessels of war (surface or underwater), special naval equipment, accessories, components and other surface vessels

ML10 "Aircraft", "lighter-than-air vehicles", "Unmanned Aerial Vehicles" ("UAVs"), aero-engines and "aircraft" equipment, related equipment, and components, specially designed or modified for military use

ML11 Electronic equipment, "spacecraft" and components, not specified elsewhere on the EU Common Military List

ML12 High velocity kinetic energy weapon systems and related equipment, and specially designed components

ML13 Armoured or protective equipment, constructions and components

ML14 'Specialised equipment for military training' or for simulating military scenarios, simulators specially designed for training in the use of any firearm or weapon specified by ML1 or ML2, and specially designed components and accessories therefor

ML15 Imaging or countermeasure equipment, specially designed for military use, and specially designed components and accessories therefor

ML16 Forgings, castings and other unfinished products, specially designed for items specified by ML1 to ML4, ML6, ML9, ML10, ML12 or ML19

ML17 Miscellaneous equipment, materials and "libraries", and specially designed components therefor

ML18 'Production' equipment and components

ML19 Directed Energy Weapon (DEW) systems, related or countermeasure equipment and test models, and specially designed components therefor

ML20 Cryogenic and "superconductive" equipment, and specially designed components and accessories therefor

ML21  Software

ML22  Technology

What firearms are subject to export controls?

Firearms are described by control entries ML1 and ML2 of the EU Common Military List. Firearms and related goods are controlled even when they are designed for use in sport rather than for military use. For example, most shotguns and rifles will be specified by ML1.

When is an export licence required?

A licence is required when military equipment is being exported to third countries, transited, transshipped or brokered. Intra-community transfers between dealers is also subject to licensing.

What if I do not apply for a licence for controlled goods? 

The cargo/item could be intercepted and withheld until it is determined whether it is subject to licensing. One would also be liable to the penalties listed in article 10 of the Military Equipment (Export Control) Regulations, SL365.13.

 How do I apply for an authorization? 

An application for an export licence must be made electronically on commerce.gov.mt or servizz.gov.mt. The information required in the application is to be typed in and submitted online together with all relevant documentation.

Supporting documentation could be copies of product manuals, end-use certificates (EUCs), waybill or bill of lading, import or export permits, invoices, certifications and operating licences, etc. Some documents are compulsory requirements across all applications, specifically the EUC and import/export permit. It is however advisable to submit all documents related to the item and transaction involved. Documents are not required in original during processing, but on issuance of a licence. Only the EUC and the application are normally requested in original.

All documents must be in English or Maltese. When this is not the case, a certified translation is to be provided together with the document. 

The guidance notes provide a more detail explanation on the application process. 

When should I submit my application? 

You should submit the application for export authorization as early as possible, and preferably before you make any contractual commitment. Processing times tend to be lengthy in view of the assessments and verifications that need to be carried out by the licensing authority in consultation with other entities. Export authorisations are normally valid for eight months. ​

The information found in this section is to be considered as non-binding.